What is a puppy mill?

Bailing Out Benji is a national, grassroots nonprofit organization that is devoted to providing the most current and accurate data regarding the puppy mill industry.  If you want to get involved in our fight to expose the puppy mill industry, don’t forget to like us on Facebook , Instagram and Twitter! You can also sign up to become one of our volunteers here


jacksonWhat is a “puppy mill”?

Our definition of the term “puppy mill” is a breeding facility in which the profit is more important than the welfare of the dogs. Think of it as a factory farm for puppies. The parents are bred every heat cycle until their bodies give out. They are forced to live in cramped cages their entire lives, their paws never touching the ground. These parent dogs are not always fed healthy food or clean water and they are very rarely (if ever) seen by a vet for illness or injury. kruse

A puppy mill can be obvious, or it can be well hidden.

What are the worst states when it comes to puppy mills?

The Midwest has the highest concentration of puppy mills, although there are other mills across the country. The Midwest is commonly referred to as “The Puppy Mill Belt”. Missouri and Iowa are the highest offenders when it comes to the sheer number of mills, but Ohio and Pennsylvania are horrible when it comes to unlicensed mills and violations. Puppy mills operations are easily hidden among agriculture buildings. The Amish and Menonite communities are also big into dog breeding. Lancaster County is one of the worst counties in the entire nation. However, they make up a small percentage of the total. 

If puppy mills are so bad, why do they exist? 

One of the most common questions we receive is, “Why are puppy mills legal”? The answer, plain and simple, is that the USDA and state agencies allow them to exist. Not every USDA licensed dog breeder runs a horrible operation. But they are all required to follow the same very lax laws the USDA set forth in the Animal Welfare Act. According to the AWA: 

-Cage size: must be 6 inches larger than the size of the dog, on all sides
-Up to 12 dogs can be housed in one cage
-Dogs never have to be let out of their cages. Breeders only need to have an exercise plan
-There is no limit to the number dogs a breeder can have—many have over 1,000
-There is no age limit for breeding dogs. If a dog is able to produce puppies for ten years, that’s how long they could be in the facility.

– The inspections are “risk based”. Meaning if there are no violations, the breeder might not see an inspector for a few years. 

The AWA does NOT cover emotional well-being. 

And there are a 115 inspectors to inspect for every single USDA facility… in the entire United States. That includes breeding facilities, factory farms, zoos, circuses, transport vehicles, testing facilities, labs and more…. 115 people to cover over 12,000 facilities.  Do you think that is enough?
For more information on the AWA, click here. 

USDA
Example of how the AWA figures up cage size.

Where are puppy mill puppies sold? 

Thousands of puppies are sold from puppy mills each year– and the general public is completely unaware of where they just got their new puppy. The breeder will “meet you half way”, so you don’t have to make the full trip, the breeder will ship the puppy on an airplane to you, or buyer doesn’t even know the purchaser because the transaction was made through a pet store. The BEST way to avoid purchasing a puppy from a puppy mill, is to adopt. But that isn’t always something the public is willing to do. So the next best way to make sure you are not buying from a puppy mill is to check out the parents, see the facility (all of it) and resist temptation from saving a puppy from a place that you deem non-reputable. You are only creating a hole for the breeder to fill with more puppies. 

Pet Store: According to the ASPCA: Breeders who sell puppies to pet stores must hold a USDA dealer license, and many states also require breeders to obtain a license to have a dog-breeding kennel. So the statistic is that 99% of puppies in pet stores are from puppy mills. They come from breeders that have enough dogs to constantly keep the cages full of puppies. And the stores will sell puppies like they would a pair of jeans, to anyone with a credit card. They don’t care where that puppy is going or how it will end up. The fact of the matter is, no reputable breeder would sell through a third party. They would want to know exactly where the puppy is going, and more often than not, they require an application and the puppies are required to come back to them if the family can not care for them any longer. 

Do you have a pet store near you? Click here to see the the paper trail between your local pet store and the puppy mills they buy from. Bailing Out Benji and our volunteers have been doing the research so we can show you exactly where those puppies came from. 

Internet: Fancy websites and Craigslist are a very easy way to sell a lot of puppies and keep people off of the property at the same time. The ASPCA and the HSUS both agree that you should never ever buy a puppy from the internet (alone). You MUST see the property where the puppies are born and raised. Anyone can design a fancy website, but you should look for these red flags. 

– If the breeder has several breeds of dogs available. 

– If they ship puppies to you

– If they offer to meet offsite. 

– If they are selling their puppies on CraigsList

– If they won’t allow you to see their property

Newspapers: Classified Ads are way that puppy mills get rid of their puppies. You would have no way of knowing what kind of breeding facility they run, because they ad is only a few sentences long. 

Dog Auctions: Dog Auctions are horrible events in which breeding dogs and puppies are sold to the highest bidder. The dogs are very rarely in good condition. The breeders selling the dogs may be going out of business, they could be getting rid of a certain breed, or they could be getting rid of the dogs that are too old. For an inside look on an auction, click here

Don’t the puppies deserve homes too? What happens to them if they don’t sell? 

20140208_165545This is another one of the most common questions that we are asked. The puppies always sell, because there is always someone that doesn’t know about the pet store/puppy mill connection. What will happen, and what has been happening, is that the public is becoming slowly more aware. This means that the puppies are staying longer in the stores, showing that there isn’t a high demand for them. When the puppies sit longer, the store puts them on sale and keeps dropping the price until they are sold. If they aren’t selling quickly, the store will order less for next month and *hopefully* the breeder will see that the demand is dropping and there isn’t a need for as many dogs on their property. But this all starts with YOU. YOU shouldn’t buy that puppy. 

Are there puppy mills near me? 

At Bailing Out Benji, we work tirelessly to educate about the horrors of puppy mills, without sharing the graphic photos. One way we have been successful in educating about and exposing these puppy mills is by showing YOU, the consumer, what is really in your back yard. Through the USDA website and, when easily accessible, state department of Agriculture websites, we have pinpointed and color-coded the puppy mills that are lurking in the United States. To view our puppy mill maps, click here.  You can also view our new interactive website here

To view all of our completed puppy mill maps, click on our link above

How can I help?

There are many ways you can help the dogs trapped in puppy mills. They vary from being active, to just being an advocate. 

1. If you SEE something, SAY something. If you were someone that unknowingly stumbled upon a bad breeding facility to purchase a puppy, you need to report it! You can either report it to the USDA, your state agency, your local rescue or shelter, or you can contact us and we can point you in the right direction! 

2. Be an educator. One of the best ways you can help is by educating your friends, family and coworkers. By sharing this article and making a status about where you shouldn’t buy a dog could deter someone you know! Our organization firmly believes that educating the general public will be the end to puppy mills. Join our growing list of teams and help us fight the industry through education and advocacy! 

3. Be an advocate. Look in your area for pet stores that sell puppies and educate about your local problem. Hang up flyers (we can help!) or even start a local protest (we can help with that too!) Getting the word out locally, will break the lies of the pet store and will bring more awareness about puppy mills to your community. 

4. Contact your legislators. By letting your legislators know what you care about, it tells them how to vote. You can send a quick email to your legislator and just ask them where they stand on common sense animal issues, especially puppy mills. You may be shocked to find out that not everyone is an advocate for the animals. 

5. Don’t give pet stores that sell puppies your money. By boycotting a pet store that sells puppies, you are showing them that you can’t support their business. You can even tell the owner why you are choosing not to shop at their store anymore. To view a list of pet stores across the country that are selling puppy mill dogs, click here

6. Look for a reputable breeder in your area. If you are set on buying a puppy and you haven’t checked your local rescues or shelters, then ask your local canine club about reputable breeders. Just remember to always check out their facilities! 

7. USE SOCIAL MEDIA….. Spread the Word. Use the hashtag #ShowMeTheMommy on social media to stress the importance of asking to see the parent dogs before purchasing a puppy. You can also use #EndPuppyMills and #BailingOutBenji ! 

8. Stay updated. Like our facebook page , twitter and instagram. Stay updated on how you can help in your area. Don’t forget to SHARE!  

 

We are a small nonprofit organization that makes big changes with very few resources. Our research is used by the leading animal welfare organizations across the country, because what we do is so unique and important.  To make a one time donation or to sign up to be a sustaining supporter to allow us to continue our various programs that expose the puppy mill industry, click the donate button below.

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Follow us on social media and get involved in the fight to #EndPuppyMills !  

 

Dog Auctions

Dog auctions are a painful and despicable fact of life here in the Midwest, maybe not Iowa as much– but definitely our neighbors to the south. As I am sure you have all realized by now, the importance of educating as many people as I can about animal-related issues is my passion.  Dog auctions are certainly no different. They go on almost every weekend… Thousands of dogs are switching from owner to owner, never knowing the love that they deserve.  I recently went to an Iowa dog auction, please read my story here …. 

 

 

How many of you haven’t ever heard of dog auctions? Let me give you this scoop!  

Picture this…

Large rooms filled ceiling high with wire cages, stuffed full of dogs whose sole purpose in life  to make puppies.  I say “was” because by the time the dogs are brought to these auctions, they are unwanted by the owner for various reasons. The term for this is “cull”. These “culls”, more often than not, can’t even breed well anymore. Each dog is identified with a number tattooed on the inside of the ear, or the inner thigh. They are almost all purebreds of  every breed and the ever so popular “designer dog”. I should tell you that it is usually impossible to tell which breed it is because of the terrible health conditions. The fur is always grown out and matted, filled with ticks and clumps of blood. Not to mention the fact that the nails are so long the dogs can barely walk. The saddest part about all of this is, the rooms are usually so quiet because the dogs are too terrified to move, let alone bark. This is the first time a lot of them have ever been out of their usual cages. It all sounds like fiction, doesn’t it?

But what can we do to change this? The people who visit these types of auctions aren’t your run of the mill (no pun intended) dog customer. These are the other puppy mill owners that are either looking to get some new blood lines into their stock or the local rescues that go in to try and save as many as dogs as possible.

 Here are a few of my suggestions:

1. Boycott puppy mills.  This means never ever  ever buying a puppy from a pet store or from a website. If you want a dog, please please please go to your local shelter or rescue. They have so many dogs that need loving FURever homes! And so much of the public doesn’t even realize that over 35% of dogs in the shelters are purebred. Don’t believe me?! Try it… Go to petfinder.com and search for a breed, I am certain you will find just what you are looking for.

2. Talk to your veterinarian and let he/she know how you feel about dog auctions and puppy mills. Try to encourage him or her to take a public stance against them.  In my experience, the vets that are near these mills know exactly what is going on, and they almost always turn a blind eye to it. Each USDA breeder must have a veterinarian that looks over their dogs once a year… That means that with the 300+ puppy mills in this state, there are that many veterinarians on their payroll… Sad, isn’t it?

3. Share this blog with your friends… Share it on facebook, twitter, email it to your coworkers, link it to your blog– I don’t care! It is just so important that we reach as many people as possible with this message. I can talk and talk all day long, but I am almost always preaching to the choir. Until we can get our neighbors, coworkers, and friends to realize that buying a dog is bad for everyone then we all fail.

As always, comments are welcomed and appreciated. Please, if you have ever been to a dog auction, share your story. You can remain nameless, but it is just one more way for people to see that these things DO happen.

Horrible video that shows exactly what I am talking about… If we don’t stop these atrocities, who will?!

–Mindi

Teach your children how to behave with animals. Adopt a pet.
Don’t go buy one. Please. That’s a sin. Let’s get these puppy mills out of
business.

They can’t all be that bad….

I had someone argue with me today about puppy mills…

His exact words were, “Not all puppy mills can be that bad, right?”

This frustrated me… Because this seemingly intelligent individual doesn’t even see the difference between a breeder and a puppy mill. This is why people get so frustrated with the word “puppy mill”. Half of them don’t understand what it means and the rest don’t use it properly. And this is also why so many people get offended and annoyed by animal welfare groups… SO let me clear things up a little bit.

Just because a person is a dog breeder, does not mean that they have a puppy mill. In my life, I have met so many wonderful breeders! In high school, I would help a family friend with his whelping. He only had two female dogs, Babe and Sierra, and he would only breed them once a year. These dogs were so loved. They lived in an air-conditioned building, they had outdoor runs and they were able to go out and run the fields while we did farm work. Every single day… And each of those puppies was equally loved. Randy only sold his dogs to the best homes. And he didn’t charge $600 for a “champion bloodline”, purebred puppy. No. He charged $150 with all shots, not to mention, each puppy could come back and train to be a hunting dog on his land. FOR FREE, with him as the teacher… We all cried each time a puppy left the house. That is what a good breeder means to me. Randy didn’t breed his dogs for the money. He bred them for the love of what he was doing. He had two amazing purebred german wire-haired pointers, and he wanted to keep their blood lines going.

It is a sad fact that on the other end of the spectrum there are unethical breeders that many refer to as puppy mills. A puppy mill is a breeding facility that produces purebred (OR DESIGNER) puppies in large numbers. The puppies are sold either directly to the public via the Internet, newspaper ads, at the mill itself or sold to brokers and pet shops across the country. Puppy mills have long concerned the Humane Society of the United States, as well as many other animal welfare groups. The documented problems of puppy mills include over breeding, inbreeding, minimal veterinary care, poor quality of food and shelter, lack of socialization with humans, overcrowded cages, and the killing of unwanted animals. To anyone that really cares about this, you can go to the USDA website and find any information on any USDA licensed breeder. You can see for yourself what it going on, like I have. The inspectors, although there aren’t enough of them to actually do their jobs, must take pictures of every thing that is against the code. These pictures are also able to be accessed by the public.

To the person that argued with me, I really hope that you are reading this… I want you to look up the Hunte Corporation in Missouri, or the Kruse family in West Point, Iowa. These are what puppy mills look like… Because I wrote about one of the bad mills I visited, doesn’t mean that there was only one bad mill. There are over 400 in Iowa. Some are worse than others. But I dare you to actually look into the world of a puppy mill dog. If you don’t want to believe the “propaganda” spread by animal welfare groups. I suggest that you Browse the USDA website and google the names I just gave you. Or go to this site: http://www.caps-web.org/ These are real people who go undercover to show people like you what is really going on. The videos aren’t altered, and the names aren’t changed. I really invite you into this and then I will gladly welcome your CONSTRUCTIVE criticism, after you are educated on this topic.

To the unwitting consumer, the situation frequently means buying a cute puppy from the store and then later facing an array of immediate veterinary problems or harboring genetically born diseases that do not appear until years later. The Humane Society of the United States strongly opposes the sale, through pet shops and similar outlets, of puppies and dogs from mass-breeding establishments. Even though I don’t feel like I need validation from anyone reading this… To the person that felt the need to argue with me about my one-sidedness… I suggest that you really do your research before you say that I am uneducated. Yes, I am very, very passionate about this, and no, passion is NOT a bad thing.

The way that we get things changed in this state is to use your voice, petition, protest, write your legislators, call your legislators, boycott things that you disagree with. I am not some silly girl with a pipe dream… I am a silly girl with 100,000 other silly Iowans that want the same thing as I do. Together we will help end the suffering that is going on in our state– Whether it be in puppy mills, the dog chained up next door, or the dog left in a hot car. Enough of us care about this and things will change. Because we are the change that we want to see in our state. By attending these free puppy mill presentations and spreading the word, we are changing the future. By asking our friend to think about adopting before buying, you are saving the life of that shelter dog. And by calling animal control when you see an animal that isn’t being treated humanely. All of these small acts do make a difference in the big picture.

To anyone that I have offended by my blog, I sincerely apologize. If you are a legitimate breeder and you are sick of getting labeled as a puppy mill, speak up! Do something about it! I suggest contacting the Iowa VCA. They want to hear from the legitimate breeders, because we are all fighting the same fight. No one is trying to take your rights away, we are just trying to give rights to the pets that you are keeping on your property. I have said it in previous posts, and I will gladly say it again. NOT ALL BREEDERS ARE BAD. Yes, I would always push for adoption. But as long as you are taking care of those animals in your care, then I have no qualms with your business…

As usual, I am always glad to hear your thoughts! Please leave me any comments

–Mindi

Dyvig’s Pet Shoppe, Ames, Iowa

Dyvig’s Pet Shoppe in Ames, Iowa sells puppies from known puppy mills. 

As an animal lover, I am asking everyone reading this to please think twice before you shop at Dyvigs Pet Shoppe in Ames, Iowa. Every Saturday morning (and some other days)  animal lovers from central Iowa gather to educate the citizens of Ames about the pet store/puppy mill connection.  Dale Dyvig, owner of the pet store,  knowingly purchases his puppies from a “family breeder” in  the “Waterloo area”, or so he tells his customers… Century Farm Puppies is located in Grundy Center, Iowa and they are the definition of a puppy mill. Dyvig also forgot to mention that he also uses New Design Kennels in Rockwell City, Iowa.  As you can see below, the CFP breeder will even tell you that the puppies are not kept in the home! 

DyvigsCFP

The owner of the store and the employees have been feeding their customers that same line for over ten years. (The pet store here in Ames is not his first pet store, he has owned at least two more in recent decades- all while using the same breeders). Now is the time for people to learn the truth about where those puppies really come from. Keep in mind, when we talked with Dale before the protests began, he said that he had visited Century Farm Puppies and was okay with everything he saw.  Here is the handout Dale was giving his customers when the protests began.

CENTURY FARM PUPPIES, GRUNDY CENTER, IOWA

This is a direct excerpt from the Century Farm Puppies website. 

Dyvigs

Below is the most recent dog count from the USDA . As you can see, Century Farm Puppies has 155 adult dogs and 48 puppies. In recent years, they have had as many as 560 dogs on their property. While their numbers are dwindling, they still have far too many dogs in their care.  It should be stated that Dale Dyvig still used and approved of these breeders when they had all of those dogs and numerous violations. 

cfp (1)

Below are a few of the violations that they have had in the past which include: a build up of days old feces, on all of the flat surfaces of their buildings there was severe buildup of hair, dirt and other debris (which affected approximately 532 dogs at the time!!) Again, see for yourself. These are screenshots of the USDA reports.

 

cfp2

 

Century Farm Puppies has been downgrading in recent years due to public pressure and the fact that more people are “waking up” about puppy mills. In recent years they had over 500 adult dogs on their property, which is an insane amount of dogs to care for. Many people have criticized us for quoting previous USDA reports, please keep in mind that Dyvig’s Pet Shoppe has used this breeder for several years and has always known what is going on in the puppy mill. Here are some of their most recent numbers. 

DyvigsUSDAA local radio station decided to look into Century Farm Puppies, what they saw and heard there were very troubling. They were not only able to see inside of the “honeymoon suites”, but they confirmed that there were over 125 dogs living inside of the sundowner buildings within the metal barn, the barking was unbearable, and there was an overwhelming smell. Not only did this confirm to us that it is a puppy mill- but what the owner, Rex Meyers, said ON AIR about the puppies he sells to Dyvigs- “…we don’t sell Teddy Bears, so those I send to the pet store.  Because they’re a cheap dog. We’re known for Cavachons.  I’d rather sell Cavachons.” 

Straight from the breeder’s mouth. The dogs he sells to Dyvig’s Pet Shoppe are cheap. For more information on Century Farm Puppies, click here. 

 

 

NEW DESIGN KENNELS, ROCKWELL CITY, IOWA

Nancy and Tom Carlson of New Design Kennels are very deep in the puppy mill world. Not only do they have a huge puppy mill of their own, they run under TWO names so the public doesn’t see that they breed several breeds of dogs (New Design Kennel and Illusion Japanese Chin) but they sell their unwanted dogs at terrible dog auctions. Most recently, In May, Nancy and Tom helped out at another dog auction that I attended. These “reputable breeders” have no problem breeding dogs that aren’t healthy. If you read the article above, you will note that many of her dogs were missing teeth, eyes and had open wounds AT THE AUCTION! Below shows you an approximate number of dogs that she sells on her property and, below that, we highlight some of her violations. For more information on New Design Kennels, please click here. 

NDK2

newdesign

 

If the inspection reports aren’t bad enough. Look at how these dogs are forced to live. 

Please remember, that the owner of Dyvig’s Pet Shoppe has been to both of these places and approved of how these dogs are kept. I am not okay with how these animals are living… Are YOU? 

NDK

Sadly, Dyvig’s Pet Shoppe also buys their small animals from a large supplier of small animals.  Yes, there are small animal (and cat) mills too

ApetTransportMill.jpg

How can you help?

 

Call or stop in!

(515)233-5625 If you feel strongly enough (and are brave enough), contact him this way. Ask him directly about the puppies and the welfare of the  parent dogs.  We do not want to see a local business close down, instead we want the owner to choose a more humane business model by  either not selling puppies at all, or choosing to help shelter dogs instead! 

Visit us on Saturdays! 

A small group of us stands in front of the store every Saturday morning (the time varies) and Sunday afternoons , educating the citizens of Ames about the pet store/puppy mill connection. Whether you join us for the full two hours or just stop by to show you support, we would love to see you! You can find out when we are at the store, through our facebook page! 

THIS NEXT PART GOES FOR EVERYONE, IN EVERY CITY, IN EVERY STATE

Don’t give your business to pet stores that sell puppies and kitties. Pet overpopulation is a terrible problem in our country and only the consumers can help change that. If you are looking for a new pet PLEASE visit your local shelter. Over 35% of dogs in shelters are purebred, they are just overlooked. If you can’t find what you are looking for at your local shelter, please try www.petfinder.com It is a tremendously helpful site! You can search for ANY BREED anywhere. Don’t breed or buy while homeless pets die! 

 

 

Don’t forget to like us on Facebook  and help spread the word! 

“A small group of thoughtful people could change the world. Indeed, it’s the only thing that ever has.” Margaret Mead

 

 

Actual Dogs Sold from Dyvigs <—-> The “Sundowner Buildings” that the mill owners refer to as “honeymoon suites” There were three of these in one building at the mill.

How much is that doggie in the window?

How many of you have walked by the pet store and saw the adorable puppy with big eyes and a wagging tail? The puppy that is just pawing at the glass for your attention. All of us animal lovers have such a hard time just walking away because we want to save them all.. Out comes the money, and there you have it- another pet store puppy is sold to the first person with $600.

While it is partly true that we saved this dog from a life unknown, at the same time,  we have  just supported a puppy mill. Almost every time someone buys a dog from a pet store or online, the dog has come from a home in which the parents are merely thought of as property.

The  fact is that in the US there are almost 10,000 puppy mills operating today. This means that there are hundreds of thousands of dogs bred in conditions that are completely appalling. These unfortunate dogs receive no human contact, no exercise or veterinary care and are often kept in tiny wire cages trapped in their own filth. Many of them, once rescued, are unable to walk properly when removed from their cage and placed on solid ground. The only concern of the puppy mill breeders is the bottom line profit they can make at the expense of the health, safety and disposition of their “product”. These mills do not have heat or air conditioning, so in the winters many of the dogs freeze to death, and in the summers, the dogs die from heat stroke.

Even more alarming is the fact that the ASPCA (who did a survey of 800 U.S. adults from across the US), the “vast majority of people surveyed -78% of them- told interviewers that they believe that puppies sold in pet stores come from such places as shelters, or private owners whose pet had litters, or they really had no idea where these animals came from.” That is just appalling to me! I can’t imagine that 78% of Americans have NO IDEA what a puppy mill is. This has got to change!

My goal with this post is not to use scare tactics to educate people. I just want to lay out the facts so I can raise awareness for the Pet Store/ Puppy mill connection. Education is the key. When people stop buying puppies in pet stores or through online internet ads, the puppy mill industry will no longer be in demand and the misery will end. Please join me in this fight.

How can you help right now?

NEVER EVER buy a dog. Whether it is directly from a breeder or online. You are putting money into the pockets of people who are helping the high numbers of euthanized pets each year in shelters.  Do you want a purebred dog? Well statistics show that 33% of dogs in shelters are actually purebred. AND most backyard breeders aren’t selling purebred puppies! You are dishing out $600 for an adorable APRI registered dog, and that means nothing! APRI is a national registry that only has the breeder send in a photo of the dog and they take a look at the face and body. Then they decide whether or not it is purebred. There are no blood tests done. APRI also doesn’t ask that you screen the dogs for genetic defects. ANY DECENT BREEDER always wants to know exactly where the dog is going. They will want references and proof that you can have the dog where you live.

ALWAYS ADOPT from an animal shelter or rescue. These pets are not “broken” or damaged. They are simply hearts that need to be loved. I have heard so many people say that they are worried about the behavioral problems and training of a shelter dog. This frustrates me. Who is going to need more training than an 8 week old puppy?

NEVER GIVE YOUR MONEY TO A PET STORE THAT SELLS PUPPIES OR KITTENS.  Not for an animal, not even for food, treats or toys. By giving this store your business and time, it is letting the owner believe that he is successful. It is important to let the owner know that you are offended that he/ she sells these animals and that your  money will never go to his business. I suggest that you write a letter (make sure it is decently respectful) that explains your reasoning for not going to their store anymore. If they feel as though their business is being threatened, they might just back down!

ALWAYS try to educate. If someone you know wants to buy a dog, please tell them what their money is really going to. Even if you “do the research” and you have “seen the parents”, you likely haven’t. So many mills today have adult dogs set aside that look pretty and healthy, so buyers are relieved to see where their puppies come from. What you aren’t seeing are the dogs stashed away in that barn 100 ft. to your left. IF you are hell-bent on getting a purebred dog, go to petfinder.com. You can search for any kind of dog and it won’t cost you nearly as much to adopt him/her as it would to buy.

**I want it to be said, again, that I do not hate all breeders. If you have a small operation and you take great care of your dogs, then I am happy to see you around. It isn’t my intention to make enemies with this. I am just trying to get the world to see that by purchasing a dog from a pet store, then you are aiding in the suffering of its parents. NOT ALL BREEDERS ARE THIS WAY. But the great breeders do not sell to pet stores. I strongly suggest you look at the USDA reports for the Hunte Corporation in Missouri and the Kruse family in West Point, Iowa. These are the breeders that need to be stopped. These are the ones that clearly put profit over the welfare of the animal. **

Again, thank you friends for always reading what I have to say. I always love to read your feedback (whether it is negative or positive). And please PLEASE share with your friends! It is so important to get this information out there! Email it to family, coworkers, facebook it, tweet it… I don’t care! I just want to someday live in a world where we “Adopt, Don’t Shop!” and where people never ask, “What is a puppy mill?”

Don’t forget to like us on facebook

For more information:

Designer Dogs  http://wp.me/p1xvZr-4h

Dyvig’s Pet Shoppe Ames, Iowa http://wp.me/p1xvZr-2w

–Mindi

“The purity of a person’s heart can be quickly measured by how they regard animals”