Century Farm Puppies (Grundy Center, Iowa)

Century Farm Puppies

Rex and Debbie Meyers

Phone: 319-824-3214

Cell Phone: 319-415-8009

Grundy Center, Iowa

CenturyFarmMain

“One woman said she didn’t know how happy the puppy would be losing it’s lake front condo and moving to Beverly Hills!”

             Rex and Debbie Meyers once told me that their puppies are shipped all over the country, mainly to Las Vegas and New Hampshire. It got me thinking… Those people must be using the internet to contact this facility! So, in honor of Century Farm Puppies brand new website, I am creating this post! I will be comparing their claims with actual reports from the USDA inspectors that visited this puppy mill. If you are stumbling upon this site because you are searching for the actual Century Farm Puppies webpage, I implore you to continue reading. Read this post in this entirety. I am about to show you behind the curtain… Behind the beautiful webpage with the adorable puppies. I am going to show you how the USDA inspectors view this “top kennel in Iowa” (*editor note, that is a self-made claim by Rex and Debbie.) First, I want to share with you, an email that we have from Deb Meyers– PROVING that the dogs are not raised in the home. 

DyvigsCFP

          The claims that you will read come straight from their website and they are the same that every other commercial dog breeder uses:

Big farm,  lots of land to run,  happy,  healthy,  USDA inspected…

The information that I will use will come from three sources: Century Farm Puppies, Dyvig’s Pet Shoppe, and the USDA inspection reports .

Example of a Sundowner building. There are 3 of them crammed into one building at this facility

 

” We have 200 acres and a Lake for the puppies to explore” (from the website) 

Rex and Debbie said that they have an outdoor pen and the puppies are only allowed to play in it. When I was on their property, they put all of the puppies in this circular gate that was no bigger than a child’s swimming pool.  They had old lawn chairs that the puppies were able to climb around and play on. Debbie told me that she gets these at garage sales or on the side of the road… ** I should mention that the adult dogs are never allowed to leave their cages. They aren’t taken out unless it is time for the “veterinarian” to visit, and most of them time they still remain in their tiny cages.

“USDA is extremely picky, they do not allow any cobwebs, fly specks, hair, etc…” (from their website) The info below is from their USDA reports. 


“Our adults have inside/outside runs with heating and air conditioning, automatic feeder/water and automatic doors.” (from their website) The info below is from the USDA reports

 

Debbie said that the only protection against the elements (weather) are flaps that come down or doors that close. She said that there was no air or heat for the parent dogs.

“Our puppies are very well cared for and spoiled…” (again, from their website) and below is the USDA reports


**Editors note: When I was there, Rex offered me bad advice when it came to heart guard. He said that you can just buy the medicine for the biggest breed and then just split it among several dogs (or among several months). This CAN NOT happen. Those heart guard pills don’t have the medication spread evenly throughout the pill. One dog may get no dose, while the other gets an overdose. PLEASE be careful and do not listen to his bad advice!

 

         I have personally been to this facility twice and have personally seen many of these violations (and much more). Thankfully, I was able to rescue a “retired” King Charles Cavalier, who had a dropped uterus during her last pregnancy. She was only three (ish) years old and the genetic defects were already showing. She was diagnosed (after visiting a real vet for the first time in her life) with luxating patellas- a genetic disorder that was passed to each puppy she had. Sadly, she isn’t the only sick adult dog there. She is the only one we could remove from that horrendous situation.

        Since Century Farm only uses the APR registry, they don’t have to screen for genetic defects… Not to mention, the USDA requires that a vet only checks out the dogs once a year. The whole situation is very unhealthy for the adult dogs.

I refer to this facility as a “puppy mill”, because they worry more about quantity and not quality. Small time, family operations do not have almost 600 dogs on their property. Here are a few of the most recent dog numbers at Century Farm puppies (from the USDA) 

DyvigsUSDA

 

 

 

 

      These are the reasons why we are picketing at Dyvig’s Pet Shoppe in Ames, Iowa. It is very important that Dale Dyvig not be associated with any breeder (especially this family)! Please contact him and express your concerns… Ask Dyvig’s Pet Shoppe to have adoptable pets, as opposed to commercially bred dogs!

 

Please don’t forget to like us on Facebook to show your support!

 

 

0 thoughts on “Century Farm Puppies (Grundy Center, Iowa)

  1. Anonymous 1

    i Really Think You Have No Place Bitching About Other People Whom You Dont Even Know. Juat Cause Someone Sellls Someone Whom U Think Is Trash Doesnt Mean The Rex Is A Bad Person. Like really you sound like an immature Birhc who has no life but u fucking stick ur nose into shit thats not ur business. Ok sorry but no one gets peoples complete 411 when they sell them an animal. so just cause u think someones trash isnt others peoples problems. maybe u need to look at urself. we have bought dogs from rex for years his a great man! so stfu u stupid bitch an get a life.

    Reply
    1. Anonymous 2

      And who sounds immature? Just as you had a right to voice your opinion about this site, they have a right voice their opinion about Century Farm Puppies and the people who run it. It’s our first amendment right, you should educate yourself on it…and spelling while you’re at it.

      Reply
  2. Anonymous 1

    If You Wanna turn someone in for animal neglet u should turn in this organization called farm of hope. there a husband and wife who are scamming uni working concessions there and gettin money for it. they live in a rental house in waterloo where they leave there dog locked in the basement with fecus all over the place. the dog barely gets fed and they keep getting evicted frome every place they move into cause there bad tenants. there even getting evicted out of there waterloo home an trying to find a place in hudson or surronding areas. there organizations was made so that they could get money from people and make up stories about the organization when they really dont have any rescue animals. they use the money they recieve to pay pills or go buy coach purses and expensive cowboy boots. the wife has an assault charge against her that she got recently. the wife has also tried to kill herself multiple times just to get attention from her husnbands family and others so that they buy her things an give her money. she seriously has problems and them scamming places for money for a Fake animal rescue to me is extremely wrong.. U should really look into that.

    Reply
    1. BailingOutBenji Post author

      So… At first you call me a stupid “birhc” for my well-written (and completely factual) post about Century Farms, and now you want me to look in to someone else? Seems kind of odd to me that you would even trust my judgement there.

      Reply
  3. Nancy

    To Anonymous, I am sorry but your post makes no sense to me, but maybe it’s because there are so many mispelled words and fragmented sentences. Are you sure you are old enough to be on the computer?? What I think you are trying to say is that we should not protect animals that are being abused,and leave greedy people alone who are profiting from this abuse, however, we will continue to let the public know what is really going on at Century Farms and encourage everyone NOT to buy their puppies which continues to drive this horrible industry.

    Reply
  4. mashad

    This situation sounds like one that needs further investigation. Legitimate breeders will tell you that there is little if any money to be made in breeding dogs and they only breed when the dam and sire are very good examples of the breed and are not genetically close. They go through the American Kennel Club before they breed to make sure that the dam or sire are not close genetically and that they are not carriers of genetic diseases. If both parents are carriers of a genetic disorder, they will produce puppies with the same disorder.

    People who run very large breeding operations,or puppy mills, tend to bypass careful checks of parents and offspring. They also tend to treat the sires and dams as objects and don’t give them the attention, exercise, or medical care that they need.

    Dogs are beings that need attention and affection. They don’t get this at large operations. They are used for their reproductive abilities and are cast aside when they’re old. During their young years when they should be enjoying a dog’s life they are frequently caged for long periods and never experience the joys that they should.

    People that are in the dog breeding business strictly to make money do not recognize dogs as the intelligent and loving animals that they are. They ignore the fact that dogs have feelings of well being and happiness and depression and terror.

    They deprive dogs of a life.

    If you are seeking a purebred dog, go to a legitimate breeder, visit the home, and get references.

    Reply
    1. Anonymous 4

      “Legitimate breeders will tell you that there is little if any money to be made in breeding dogs and they only breed when the dam and sire are very good examples of the breed and are not genetically close.” – Not true. It is entirely possible to fairly treat a group of dogs and make a living by selling the puppies they raise. It requires dedication, investment, and a willingness to put up with being called an evil person by ARs.

      “They go through the American Kennel Club before they breed to make sure that the dam or sire are not close genetically and that they are not carriers of genetic diseases.” – Incorrect. The AKC, like any registry, is dependent on the honesty of those who register their dogs. No registry can guarantee their members are honest or treat their dogs fairly. In fact, the AKC has been boycotted by breeders in past years for in competencies like paperwork errors, months-long turnaround times to fix problems, and unhelpful customer service.

      “If both parents are carriers of a genetic disorder, they will produce puppies with the same disorder.” – Quite right!

      “People who run very large breeding operations,or puppy mills, tend to bypass careful checks of parents and offspring. They also tend to treat the sires and dams as objects and don’t give them the attention, exercise, or medical care that they need.” – Stereotypical statement. I could answer it by saying “People who oppose dog breeding tend to put every kennel under the same blanket description that labels it an animal abusing, inhuman facility with greedy owners who have no regard for the welfare of their dogs.” But then, that would be stooping to your level.

      “Dogs are beings that need attention and affection.” – Absolutely true! ” They don’t get this at large operations.” – Absolutely false! (See blanket statement above). “They are used for their reproductive abilities and are cast aside when they’re old. During their young years when they should be enjoying a dog’s life they are frequently caged for long periods and never experience the joys that they should.” – So a kennel dog isn’t happy? If they are well treated, well cared for, I guarantee you they are happy. Not only that, but they make a special bond between them and their owners just like any house dog. Are there some facilities that do not take the time to do this? Yes, there are. Do they include the entire industry? No, they do not.

      “People that are in the dog breeding business strictly to make money do not recognize dogs as the intelligent and loving animals that they are. They ignore the fact that dogs have feelings of well being and happiness and depression and terror.” – See blanket statement above. Apparently you’re saying that anyone who wants to make a living raising dogs is an inherently evil, greedy person? Wouldn’t you say that living your life through the filter of stereotypes is just as wrong? By the way, your stereotype is incorrect. Many dog breeders could make a living MUCH more easily in a different occupation. Dog breeding is an intense, time-consuming, and risky business. It also puts a person under the scrutiny of people such as yourself who talk them down like you just did. They don’t raise dogs because it’s easy, they raise dogs because they want to.

      “They deprive dogs of a life.

      If you are seeking a purebred dog, go to a legitimate breeder, visit the home, and get references.” – Not a bad idea. But please bear in mind that any breeder who has their dogs’ interest truly at heart will be hesitant to allow you to see them. Kennel dogs are kept in a very carefully disease-controlled environment, and the introduction of a new person to the environment can bring communicable diseases or stress mother dogs with newborn puppies. It takes a very good reason to make a responsible breeder allow someone to tour their kennel, and they will not do it for just anyone. So don’t be surprised if the most healthy-looking puppy comes out of the most supervised, controlled facility.

      Reply
      1. BailingOutBenji Post author

        Anonymous, are you a dog breeder? I am only making this connection because you referred to us as “AR”s, and that is a term that I have only heard from dog breeders (not that there aren’t other people who use this term as well). I think that throwing that term at all of us would be like me calling every breeder a puppy mill owner (which I don’t do).

        I know that there are excellent breeders out there, sadly they don’t step up and speak out against the not-so-great breeders. However, the term “puppy mill” shouldn’t offend these reputable breeders because it doesn’t apply to them. In my opinion, puppy mills are the ones that have a constant supply of puppies and they always have many breeds available (thus why it is referred to as a mill). The places that we are against are the ones that are basically factory farming dogs, not to mention, the places that have frequent violations on their inspection reports.

        If you want to sell dogs, fine, but I think that for every glamorous website you have, your inspection reports should shown as well. There should be a link on every website that shows the actual USDA inspection, so people can make an informed decision. That is why I made this post. It is only fair for the potential buyers to see exactly what is going on inside this kennel, compared to what the Meyers’ say goes on. It will attract attention from animal lovers who are against breeding and it will attract attention from breeders that will have their complaints as well.

        At least the factual information is out there now.

        Reply
  5. mashad

    The way to stop this nastiness is through boycott. Give the pet stores plenty of notice but be willing to publicize their participation if necessary, but don’t attack the pet store unless it knowingly supports puppy millls.

    The real offenders are the puppy mill breeders and they need to be exposed.

    However, if pet shops continue to support them, boycott the pet shop.

    Reply
    1. BailingOutBenji Post author

      We have talked with this pet shoppe, and both the owner/ the Meyers have informed me that they are long time “family” friends… Dale Dyvig has been to this facility and has given it his okay. After talking to him, writing letters, and talking to him again, the pet store demonstration is one of the last things we could do. We have been out there every Saturday since Black Friday and have no intention of stopping until he cuts ties with his breeder friends.

      Reply
  6. Anonymous 3

    I think maybe someone needs to reread the article and point out specific areas of so called “bitching”. I wouldn’t call something “bitching” for a buyer to expect a puppy breeder to actually breed for overall longevity, health, and temperment. I’m glad someone is purchasing puppies that will most likely have shortened life spans due to preventable congenital and hereditary defects. I would love to ask the breeders if they even know the common ailments of the dogs they breed and if any of their dogs are carriers. None of the above is unjust as there are legitimate sources. The hard facts are that people are factory farming puppies and selling at top dollar, less than stellar “products”. Livestock and like hogs and cattle more often have better care, sanitary conditions and breeding than dogs in mills.

    Reply
  7. Lisa Kuehl

    Unfortunately, many puppy mills in Iowa follow this pattern…a glossy, colorful, feel-good website filled with photos of adorable but artifically posed puppies, pretty outbuildings, and claims of being USDA or “AKC” inspected ( which may be true, but remember, the USDA inspects as per the federal Animal Welfare Act guidelines, which are very inadequate. For example, it permits a dog to live it’s entire life in a wire cage no bigger than 6″ longer and wider than the dog’s body is from nosetip to tail base, with merely 6″ of head room required. The AWA also allows dogs, even indoor breeds like Poodles and Bichons, to live completely outdoors, albeit in enclosures, without heat or a cooling source. ) Also, misleading verbiage on websites about how the puppies are cared for and a lack of explanation for how the parent dogs are cared for is commonplace. Over and over we see inconsistencies with what the website shows and says in comparison to how the actual properties look and what the more vigilent USDA inspectors are actually seeing and reporting. This is misrepresentation of business practices and a consumer protection issue. Sadly, breeders who are found to be non-compliant with the AWA are rarely reprimanded or fined for their neglect..they are merely offered more time in which to correct a situation that is harmful to the dogs. The inspection process is inadequate because the AWA is inadequate. It’s time to rewrite this document to provide proper protections for the breeding dogs forced into this nightmarish life.

    Reply
    1. Anonymous 4

      “Which may be true, but remember, the USDA inspects as per the federal Animal Welfare Act guidelines, which are very inadequate. For example, it permits a dog to live it’s entire life in a wire cage no bigger than 6″ longer and wider than the dog’s body is from nosetip to tail base, with merely 6″ of head room required. The AWA also allows dogs, even indoor breeds like Poodles and Bichons, to live completely outdoors, albeit in enclosures, without heat or a cooling source.” – What would be your standard, Lisa?

      “Sadly, breeders who are found to be non-compliant with the AWA are rarely reprimanded or fined for their neglect..they are merely offered more time in which to correct a situation that is harmful to the dogs.” – What would you do in this situation, Lisa? Would you give the breeder time to correct the problem or would you punish them immediately?

      Reply
      1. StopCruelty

        I am sorry but do you hate dogs? Would you stick a dog in a cage and just leave it to die with nothing but crap and some water. Is that what you want of your life or anything’s life for that matter? Right now I would love to treat you the way you want to treat animals, like they feel nothing. Well I guess if that is how you are if want to abuse a creature. And by the way, a bitch is a female dog and I have a lot more respect for any bitch than I do for you you cruel person. You should be ashamed.

        Reply
  8. Rational Person Not Afraid Of Science

    Your advice on heart guard (sic) seems silly to me. Do you really think it would be possible for a medicine to evenly distribute across pills the size of a postage stamp, and then have it unevenly distributed within that postage stamp space? Just like your claim elsewhere that one cat couple can create 60,000+ in a few years. It never has happened, never will happen, so why state it as if it is a fact?

    “**Editors note: When I was there, Rex offered me bad advice when it came to heart guard. He said that you can just buy the medicine for the biggest breed and then just split it among several dogs (or among several months). This CAN NOT happen. Those heart guard pills don’t have the medication spread evenly throughout the pill. One dog may get no dose, while the other gets an overdose. PLEASE be careful and do not listen to his bad advice!”

    Reply
    1. BailingOutBenji Post author

      Dear Rational Woman,

      I was referring to advice that I was given from a veterinarian when it comes to the heart guard. I wouldn’t know from experience, as I do not make the medicine. I will take the advice of a professional, though, over advice from a man that has plenty of outdated medicine in his fridge (that he currently uses).

      As for the picture that you are referring to with the cats and their litters, I didn’t state it as a fact. I posted a picture to visually prove a point. Animals that are not spayed/neutered produce a lot of unwanted litters. It is a simple fix. If you have a pet, get it altered. It is that easy.

      Sincerely,
      Mindi

      Reply
    2. Linda R. Blakely

      To commentor: “Rational Person Not Afraid of Science”

      It’s hard to battle wits with an unarmed person therefore I’ll just post the facts and statistics and let them speak for themselves.

      HEARTGUARD: Contact any veterinarian and they will explain the distribution of Heartworm medicine. It can not be broken up and is specific for age and weight. If you google you will find numerous articles explaining the reason behind this. Try this one on for size. http://www.drsfostersmith.com/product/prod_display.cfm?pcatid=9464

      Second the statistics on reproduction are as follows:
      One adult male one adult female FELINE and their offspring can produce 420,000 cats in 7 years.
      One adult male, one adult female CANINE and their offspring can produce 67,000 dogs in 6 years.
      The figure you quoted doesn’t even exist so since you have no “facts” to base your statement, I’ll just toss it out there as opinion…which you certainly have the right to have.

      Your “rationale” for your comments however is attacking and unnecessary. Please educate yourself on the subject at hand before spewing darts at the blogger. She’s a well educated and informed individual who many of us have a respect for!

      Reply
  9. Dee Martin

    I am glad you point these places out.Some people are too ignorant to check places out.They believe the trash these people tell them. Puppy mills are horrible.Even the ones that are clean and the dogs are sort of taken care of are bad.I know a place where the kennels are clean and the dogs are fed well but they never pet or socialize their breeding stock.They are frightened of people.All dogs deserve to be loved.

    Reply
  10. Alicia Janssen

    Good for you for being outspoken and for saving these dogs’ lives! I will absolutley spread that word about this place…I hate that these places are so close to home, it’s disgusting. Keep on doing the right thing!

    Reply
  11. Chris Woodburn

    “Anonymous” buy a dictionary. You sound like grade 3 were the best 4 years of your life. and anyone who operates a puppy mill gives the rest of society the right to criticize.

    Reply
  12. Empathy Wins

    Hopefully you have IP tracking so “Anon” can be given a name…. perhaps a direction to which kennel that person is running… no one should be permitted by law to live solely on breeding animals! No animal should be bred until the age of 18 months old, should not have more than one litter a year up to the age of 5 years old then spayed/neutered. I have a very strong hunch that within 5 years, the laws will be quite similar, so breeders may as well get ready now!
    As for “Rational Woman” put your money where your mouth is, uneducated opinions like yours are the main cause of tax payers grief and animals born just to die.
    I run a no kill animal rescue for 30 years, we now deal with mostly cats due to their breeding patterns, they are in abundance, especially rural like we are… several breeders have finally clamed their heals and cut back (they are tired of having left overs of litters tha tthey just end up shooting!)
    Mindi, you are dead on the money – YES, they can breed up to that many within 7 years (of course including their offspring and offspring of their offspring) – the SPCA claims 450,000 within 7 yrs http://www.spca.bc.ca/pet-care/health-safety/a-problem-you-can-fix.html
    Many countries are calling for new breeding laws. The people want regular check ups (4 a yr) to any licensed breeder – any reputable breeder won’t mind. Consumers have the right!!!
    Many countries are now stipulating that bitches cannot breed past 6 litters and are to be spayed thereafter.
    Ireland has a new breeding bill -who would think they had a problem at all – think again, breeders don’t comply and several place themselves above the law, answer to no one and make reputable breeders look bad.
    Here’s Ireland’s new laws – look to pg 15, No 29 (e) and (f) http://www.oireachtas.ie/documents/bills28/acts/2010/a2910.pdf – no more than 6 yrs of breeding with only one litter a year…..

    If this kennel in particular, is that bad, have the authorities been contacted?
    What is their view?
    What is the factual history behind this blog/page – where are pictures of the filth, where are the documents that state there are breaches?
    Mindi, I am posting this page to my group, asking that they write the Pet store owner, no one wants pet stores selling live companion animals anymore, they are not the professionals in the field, rescues, shelters or pro vet checked breeders are… pet stores do not have the best interest of the animal at heart, there is no homecheck, no guarantees, no backup or assistance once an animal is “purchased”
    You’re fighting a good fight, just try to get more evidence to back your claims, it really helps the cause!!

    Reply
  13. Lisa Kuehl

    USDA inspection reports are excellent evidence and they are public record. Sometimes these reports, along with consumer compaints, are all we have to go on, since most breeders refuse entry into their facilites by anyone other than licensed USDA or state of Iowa inspectors. This kennel, like many that are considered compromising by most regular folks, are perfectly legal as per the federal Animal Welfare Act. Breeders who violate the AWA are rarely reprimanded, unless very gross acts of repetitive neglect go on for months or years. The USDA is very forgiving in this regard. See my previous post for an explanation on why the AWA offers inadequate protection for the dogs.

    Reply
  14. Dog Days

    The Meyers whom own the Puppy Mill Century Farm Puppies prides themselves on being a long time Grundy County resident. They got into horses that didn’t pay off, dumped them at the nearest auction to go to whomever or to kill houses, then they decided dogs, got into larger dogs, oops that didn’t work so good either, too much work for those not highly motivated.
    Sold their Culls (unwanted breeding stock) to a man that has mental problems and had been classified as an arsonist by the town folk.
    Passed their larger breeds onto him, within a year he was busted for severe neglect and horrific conditions at his Puppy Mill which was right down the road from the upstanding Meyer’s.
    They took the money and ran, dumped their dogs on this criminal and again showed what they are about.
    GREED! Nothing Christian about these people.
    They can play it up all they want, use their longevity in the County as something that makes them honorable and decent? Spruce up the hell hole with a fancy Morton Building, call themselves 3 generations of breeders, sell off their pups to whomever shows them the money? Yes, real upstanding citizens, making the world a little better place one litter at a time.
    They and their business disgust me, I have 0 respect for any of them, when not a one of them can stand up and say this is wrong, they are as inbred as their dogs.
    May they someday feel the isolation and lack of care these parent dogs have suffered with, that would be just Karma.
    And as far as any Pet Shop owner that sells these puppies and tries the ignorant, naive routine, they know exactly what they are supporting, and know it’s morally wrong, would they go out and screw around on their spouse, probably not as their moral compass says that is wrong. It is just as wrong to be a part of a seedy industry that in even the least way harms animals and at the most houses them in conditions worse then a rapist would live in prison.
    Wake up and smell the carcasses, not only those at the Puppy Mills but all those that are killed and incinerated because their time ran out at a Shelter or they were never even given a chance because there are so many homeless dogs and cats in Iowa alone.
    Shameful behavior in a Country that prides itself on doing better.
    You’re either part of the problem or part of the solution, choose wisely, because what goes around come around.

    Reply
  15. Tracy

    Why is anyone even buying a pet from any place other than an animal shelter or rescue group? Their are way too many unwanted pets as it is. Shame on anyone who purchases from a breeder of any type, or from a pet store selling from a breeder. You are just as bad as the Puppy Mill owners. You are keeping them in business. Breeding needs to be made illegal. NO ONE should be making a profit from breeding. Newspapers should also stop letting people advertise puppies they have bred. It is absolutely redneck & disgusting.

    Reply
  16. janisum

    Anonymous person- Your ignorance is a shame. Also, your name calling without showing who you are is very weak, shallow and shows your immaturity so I have no time for you. The very same characteristics that our world does not need.

    Reply
  17. janisum

    Another very well written testament to the sad truth about puppy mills, Mindi. You couldn’t have done a better job. I wish these lessons could be taught in schools but with voices like yours it won’t be long before Iowa makes the changes that many other states are. We have always been behind. Iowa can’t afford to lose anymore respect.

    Reply
  18. Pingback: Dyvigs Pet Shoppe, Ames, Iowa « Bailing out Benji

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  20. Anonymous

    I can’t even begin to express how thankful I am for this site. My mother and I were both looking at getting puppies from CF’s and the thought of this makes me sick to my stomach. I would be lying if I said I didn’t have reservations about this being a “puppy mill” after my 45 minute talk with Rex on the phone. Although Rex was very nice and informative on the phone something seemed to be a bit off. I found the fact that Rex told me that they have to micro-chip these puppies to keep them straight was odd. That can only mean one thing…way too many at once…. How could they possibly care and spoil all these puppies like they claim? Also the low cost of $600.00?… Lets face it “Designer Dogs” are not that cheap. Other well know Cavachon breeders charge $2500+ some as high as $5,000. THANK YOU again for taking the time to put this site up and try to stop this horrific puppy mill!!! The sad truth is they are probably nice people who got greedy with the puppy breeding like so many others do….So very sad. I wish I could save these puppies from the misery they are forced to endure there in Iowa. It is especially gut wrenching to think of the parent dogs who have to birth these puppies over and over, and the puppies that suffer in those terrible sounding conditions. I can’t even bare the thought of what happens to the puppies that are born with heath problems or that don’t get adopted. The thought horrifies me. The puppies that go to good homes are the lucky ones. Shame on Rex and Deb. I can only pray this puppy mill is shut down. Thank you again!!

    Reply
    1. janisum

      It is such a awesome! feeling to know that Mindi’s blog taught you enough to know what to watch for. Amen for not buying from CF and for sharing your experience

      Reply
    2. StopCruelty

      I am buying a cavachon puppy very soon and was about to buy a cavachon from them also. I cannot believe how ignorant I was. I fell for the glamour site and am very very glad I found this blog and didn’t buy into cruelty. We are doing a lot of research now! We may even adopt a dog soon and are donating to a rescue all because we saw this blog! It is a real eye opener. I don’t know if I could live with buying into puppy mills. I am now going to educate others about puppy mills and the importance of staying away! Thanks a million you changed my life and another dog’s!

      Reply
  21. mk

    Thanks for the information Mindi. I have a few comments about the posts.

    Someone commented that good breeders don’t like to let people near their puppies because of disease and the dam’s anxiety(not exact quote). I agreed with the comment in general but I can’t imagine buying a puppy without seeing the conditions of the place and getting a sense for how the sires, dams, and puppies are treated. My understanding is, and correct me if I’m wrong, that parvo virus is the biggest threat to puppies. They now get the shot right after birth(correct?) instead of at 8 weeks. They also get wormed right from birth. I know there is a bit of risk, but I can’t imagine not at least visiting the place even if I wasn’t allowed to handle the puppies. I visited the breeder before I put a deposit on my puppy and twice after. I was very impressed. The puppies were handled by the parents and kids very frequently and from 3 weeks, my first visit, the puppies were amazingly friendly and engaged. When I took her home at 8 weeks, she was confident, secure and a complete delight. As for the dam’s anxiety, good breeders can make the distinction whether a particular dam would get too stressed out with strangers near the puppies. This dam was very social and not worried a bit. If this kennel had been a puppy mill, I would have turned them in immediately. If there were any signs of abuse I would have turned them in. In both cases, I would warn people away from them.

    Puppy factory owners give legitimate breeders a bad name, which is unfortunate. We had a great experience with the breeder and with Story County Shelter where we got our other dog and cats.

    As Mindi has said many times, we should refrain from buying puppies at puppy mills or from the pet shops that sell them. Heartbreaking as it is to think a puppy may not get a home, the best way to truly make a lasting difference is to destroy the market for these puppies.

    Reply
  22. Susie

    We recently bought 2 puppies from Century Farms (Rex & Deb). They were both shipped to Newark, NJ via Delta.
    We took them to the vet the following day and here is what got to know. The girl, 13 weeks, weighed 3 Lbs and the boy, 10 weeks, weighed 2 lbs. The girl had some sort of a surgery performed on her stomach plus has a abnormal hind leg, which we were not notified on and the boy was neutered 2 weeks ago which was not right according to the vet. From the time we got got the puppies, the boy was constantly throwing up and would not hold any food – was too little to be shipped. We were assured by Rex that both puppies were in sound health and weighed 3 lbs.
    When we called Rex, he said don’t spend money on NY vets as they charge so much, and if the puppy has to die then let him die. We were shocked to hear this and had no idea that Rex & Deb run a puppy mill where condition of the adult dogs and their pups is highly sub-standard and below USDA standards.
    Is there any way that your could place this write-up at the beginning of the page so people can read the latest reviews first. Somebody needs to do some investigation on this CF puppy mill and need to close it down.

    Reply
    1. BailingOutBenji Post author

      Susie, I sent you an email. We have been working on Century Farm Puppies for over a year now. It is up to people like you that decided to buy and dog and ended up with a sick one, to stand up and fight.

      Reply
    2. micki

      Hi I have just recently talked to Rex. Poor dogs and puppies. I do not live in IA so it’s not convenient for me to visit the facilities although he says we are more than welcomed to visit. Why are these people not getting shut down and fined?

      Reply
  23. Grey's friar Bobby

    I had my dog put down 2/2011. He was 13 and had numerous health problems. I went to Century Farm the following month to find another.(Much too soon) Rex and Deb were there with their many pups. Although they were both very friendly and knowledgeable about their “merchandise” they didn’t ask me a single question about my puppy parenting skills. They did ask for a deposit for the puppy I ended up selecting. Cute little guy but had frequent vomiting and diarrhea. He was so miserable, he would cry. After many trips to the vet things are much better. I recently stopped by the vet to get some food for him. One of the techs said to him, “Boy you really had a hard start in life”. I do wonder if he had some underlying health issues that I was not made aware of but I’m sticking with him. People always say to adopt a pet from a shelter but I think puppies can be rescued from puppy mills, too

    Reply
    1. janisum Janet Schminkey

      Rescuing from a puppy mill seems a kind thing to do but in all actuality, it’s perpetuating the cycle of breeding that needs to stop.

      When rescuing from a shelter it leaves a place open for yet another homeless one. When buying from a puppy mill, it’s one less. And the mill owners will replace quickly with another batch of their “commodity”. So there is a major reason to adopt.

      Reply
  24. Sofia Schramm

    How can this f’ing mill be allowed to operate!? What can be done to put these bastards out of business? I literally could care less what these uneducated, ignorant people who say stay out of their business. I only laugh at how pathetic their lack of knowledge of the mill industry is. Please lets shut these SOB’s down!

    Reply
  25. Lisa Weaver

    Wow,looks like a beautiful facility for these animals!NOT!!!!!!All that land and they can’t even have a huge fenced in area for the dogs to run and play in!!And the adults can only come out of their cages for vet care?Sickening!!As usual,humans mistreating dogs for their own benefit to make money.I’d like to take these owners and make them spend at least 7 years in a cage,not being able to come outside and run or even walk in the nice green grass that’s right outside the door!
    Shut these places down once and for all!!And people need to stop buying puppies from pet stores and off of the internet or places like this one will continue running!

    Reply
  26. Carol

    I just want to add we bought a cavachon from them almost seven years ago not knowing that they were a puppy mill and have had numerous health problems like kidney and arthritis issues Our medical costs have been over $3,000 so far.

    Reply
  27. Janet Schminkey

    The choice of words used by the anonymous commenter is only more proof these people are sick and cruel. The anger she displays is that of a typical quilty abuser. Let’s go get them!!!!!! Let’s save the poor dogs.. Thanks Mindi, from the bottom of my heart

    Reply

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